Implications of treating family violence for the therapist: Secondary traumatization, vicarious traumatization, and growth

Anat Ben-Porat, Haya Itzhaky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

68 Scopus citations

Abstract

Our study dealt with the positive and negative implications of working with victims of family violence on therapists in terms of secondary traumatization, vicarious traumatization, and growth. In addition, we examined positive and negative changes that the therapists experienced in themselves, their lives, and their families as a result of their work. The research population consisted of 143 social workers employed in the field of family violence, and 71 social workers who were not employed in that field. Comparisons between the two groups were conducted for all of the research variables. The two groups did not differ significantly in levels of secondary traumatization. However, significant differences were found in levels of growth, as well as in levels of positive and negative changes that the participants experienced in themselves, their lives, and their families.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)507-515
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Family Violence
Volume24
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Supported by the Schnitzer Foundation for Research on the Israeli Economy and Society. A.Ben-Porat . H. Itzhaky (*) Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel e-mail: [email protected]

Funding

Supported by the Schnitzer Foundation for Research on the Israeli Economy and Society. A.Ben-Porat . H. Itzhaky (*) Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel e-mail: [email protected]

FundersFunder number
Schnitzer Foundation for Research on the Israeli Economy and Society

    Keywords

    • Family violence therapists
    • Growth
    • Secondary traumatization
    • Vicarious traumatization

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