Hyperconnectivity during screen-based stories listening is associated with lower narrative comprehension in preschool children exposed to screens vs dialogic reading: An EEG study

Rola Farah, Raya Meri, Darren S. Kadis, John Hutton, Thomas DeWitt, Tzipi Horowitz-Kraus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives Dialogic reading (DR) is a shared storybook reading intervention previously shown to have a positive effect on both literacy and general language skills. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of DR compared to screen-based intervention on electrophysiological markers supporting narrative comprehension using EEG. Methods Thirty-two typically developing preschoolers, ages 4 to 6 years, were assigned to one of two intervention groups: Dialogic Reading Group (DRG, n = 16) or Screen Story Group (SSG, n = 16). We examined the effect of intervention type using behavioral assessment and a narrative comprehension task with EEG. Results The DRG showed improved vocabulary and decreased functional connectivity during the stories-listening task, whereas the SSG group showed no changes in vocabulary or connectivity. Significantly decreased network strength and transitivity and increased network efficiency were observed in the DRG following intervention. Greater network strength and transitivity at follow-up were correlated with increased vocabulary. Conclusions The results suggest the beneficial effect of DR in preschool-age children on vocabulary and EEG-bands related to attention in the ventral stream during narrative comprehension.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0225445
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume14
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2019
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 Farah et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Funding

The study was supported by the Alon award. The funder had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. The authors thank the families and children who participated in the study. The authors also thank PJ Library Israel for contributing the books for the intervention and J. Denise Wetzel for review and editing of the manuscript. The authors thank the reviewers for their outstanding contribution in improving the quality of this manuscript.

FundersFunder number
PJ Library Israel

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