How religiosity and spirituality influences the ecologically conscious consumer psychology of Christians, the non-religious, and atheists in the United States

Sidharth Muralidharan, Carrie La Ferle, Osnat Roth-Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Despite global warming and climate change remaining top environmental issues, many people do not prioritize the environment. However, religious and spiritual beliefs can influence pro-environmental behavior. Therefore, we focused on understanding how religiosity and spirituality among Christians, the non-religious, and atheists, influence ecologically conscious consumer behavior (ECCB) through environmental values (i.e. egoistic, altruistic, and biospheric) and issue involvement. Using Qualtrics, we recruited a US sample of Christians (n = 362), the non-religious (n = 132), and atheists (n = 84). Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) analyses confirmed the hypothesized model. Overall, the findings suggest that religiosity is related to the environmental values of Christians and the non-religious. This relationship increased issue involvement and positively impacted participants’ ECCB. More importantly, irrespective of religious affiliation, perceived spiritual connection with nature promoted ECCB.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)71-87
Number of pages17
JournalArchive for the Psychology of Religion
Volume46
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2024
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2024.

Funding

The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: We are grateful to have received funding from the following sources to help undertake this research: the Meadows School of the Arts and the Temerlin Advertising Institute at Southern Methodist University and the Sam Taylor Fellowship.

FundersFunder number
Meadows School of the Arts
Temerlin Advertising Institute at Southern Methodist University

    Keywords

    • Atheism
    • ecologically conscious consumer behavior
    • environmental values
    • issue involvement
    • non-religious
    • religiosity
    • spirituality

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