Horvat 'Ethri - A Jewish village from the second temple period and the Bar Kokhba revolt in the judean foothills

Boaz Zissu, Amir Ganor

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18 Scopus citations

Abstract

The ancient site is located in the Judaean Shephelah, on an elongated ridge. It was founded at the end of the Persian period. The village was at its largest in the first century CE, covering an area of c. 12 dunams. Based on finds of at least four ritual baths (miqwa'ot), stone vessels, pottery types, oil lamps and the coins assemblage, it's inhabitants were most likely Jewish. The village was abandoned following the Jewish War against the Romans (66-70 CE) and re-inhabited in the interval between the two Jewish revolts. It participated in the Bar Kokhba Revolt (132-135 CE) and was violently destroyed. The place was resettled partially during the Late Roman period by gentiles, and existed until the fifth century CE. The most outstanding feature uncovered is a public building containing a courtyard, a large miqveh and a vestibule opening into a rectangular hall with three pillars in its centre. The structure, perhaps a synagogue, was erected between the revolts against the Romans and used until the Bar Kokhba Revolt.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)90-136
Number of pages47
JournalJournal of Jewish Studies
Volume60
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

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