Hide or Seek? Physiological Responses Reflect Both the Decision and the Attempt to Conceal Information

Nathalie klein Selle, Naama Agari, Gershon Ben-Shakhar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

The process of information concealment is more relevant than ever in this day and age. Using a modified concealed-information test (CIT), we aimed to unmask this process by investigating both the decision and the attempt to conceal information in 38 students. The attempt to conceal (vs. reveal) information induced a differential physiological response pattern within subjects—whereas skin conductance increased in both conditions, respiration and heart rate were suppressed only in the conceal condition—confirming the idea that these measures reflect different underlying mechanisms. The decision to conceal (vs. reveal) information induced enhanced anticipatory skin conductance responses. To our knowledge, this is the first study that observed such anticipatory responses in an information-concealment paradigm. Together, these findings imply that our physiological responses reflect, to some degree, both the decision and the attempt to conceal information. In addition to strengthening CIT theory, this knowledge sheds novel light on anticipatory responding in decision making.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1424-1433
Number of pages10
JournalPsychological Science
Volume30
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2019
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2019.

Keywords

  • anticipatory responding
  • arousal inhibition
  • autonomic responses
  • concealed-information test
  • open data
  • open materials
  • orienting response
  • preregistered

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