Gender Differences in the Spillover Between Romantic Experiences, Work Experiences, and Individual Adjustment Across Emerging Adulthood

Shmuel Shulman, Brett Laursen, Daniel J. Dickson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examines the interplay between negative romantic experiences, negative work experiences, and anxiety/depressive symptoms at three time points across ages 24-29 in a sample of 176 Israeli emerging adults. Males (n = 96) and females (n = 80) described different patterns of longitudinal spillover between work, romantic relationships, and well-being. For males, higher levels of negative romantic experiences predicted increases in negative work experiences, and higher levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms predicted increases in negative romantic experiences. For females, higher levels of negative work experiences predicted increases in later negative romantic experiences. For both males and females, higher levels of negative work experiences predicted later increases in anxiety and depressive symptoms. Findings of this study conducted on emerging adults align with existing research on work-family spillover and its effects on individual well-being.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)36-47
Number of pages12
JournalEmerging Adulthood
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: This study was funded by grant # 1016/05 from the Israeli Science Foundation—ISF to Shmuel Shulman. Brett Laursen received support from the U.S. National Science Foundation (0909733 and 0923745) and the U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (HD068421).

Keywords

  • emerging adults
  • family-work spillover
  • gender differences
  • romantic experiences
  • work experiences

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