Game theory and the frequency selective interference channel: A practical and theoretic point of view

Amir Leshem, Ephraim Zehavi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

70 Scopus citations

Abstract

The success of unlicensed broadband communication has led to very rapid deployment of communication networks that work independently of each other using a relatively narrow spectrum. For example, the 802.11g standard uses the industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) band that has a total bandwidth of 80 MHz. This band is divided into 12 partially overlapping bands of 20 MHz. These technologies could become the victims of their own success, since the relatively small number of channels and the massive use of the technology in densely populated metropolitan areas can cause significant mutual interference. This is especially important for high quality real-time distribution of multimedia content that is intolerant to errors as well as latency.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)28-40
Number of pages13
JournalIEEE Signal Processing Magazine
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by Intel Corporation. Amir Leshem was partially supported by the Netherlands Foundation of Science and Technology under grant STW 10459.

Keywords

  • Broadband communication
  • Game theory
  • Interference channels
  • Nash equilibrium
  • Radio spectrum management

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