Exploring the recognition memory deficit in Parkinson's disease: Estimates of recollection versus familiarity

Patrick S.R. Davidson, David Anaki, Jean A. Saint-Cyr, Tiffany W. Chow, Morris Moscovitch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

59 Scopus citations

Abstract

Current theories postulate that recognition memory can be supported by two independent processes: recollection (i.e. vivid memory for an item and the contextual details surrounding it) versus familiarity (i.e. the mere sense that an item is old). There is conflicting evidence on whether recognition memory is impaired in Parkinson's disease, perhaps because few studies have separated recollection from familiarity. We aimed to explore whether recollection or familiarity is more likely to be affected by Parkinson's disease, using three methods: (i) the word-frequency mirror effect to make inferences about recollection and familiarity based on recognition of high- versus low-frequency words, (ii) subjective estimates of recollection (remembering) versus familiarity (knowing), and (iii) a process-dissociation procedure where participants are required to endorse only some of the previously studied items on a recognition memory test, but not others. We tested Parkinson's disease patients (n = 19 and n = 16, age range = 58-77 years and age range = 50-75 in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively) and age- and education-matched controls (n = 23 and n = 16 in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively). Overall, the Parkinson's disease group showed a reduction in recognition memory, but this appeared to be primarily due to impairment of familiarity, with a lesser decline in recollection. We discuss how this pattern may be related to dysfunction of striatal, prefrontal and/or medial temporal regions in Parkinson's disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1768-1779
Number of pages12
JournalBrain
Volume129
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2006
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by a fellowship from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research to P.S.R.D., grants from the National Institutes of Health (F32 AG022802) and the University of Toronto Dean’s Fund for New Faculty (457494) to T.W.C., an endowment to the Sam and Ida Ross Memory Clinic at Baycrest Centre to T.W.C., and an award from the Jack and Rita Catherall Research Fund at Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care. We thank Asaf Gilboa for collecting some of the control data, Lauren Silver and Adrianna Zec for assistance with scoring and data entry, and Andrew Yonelinas for the algorithm used in Experiment 2.

Funding

This research was supported by a fellowship from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research to P.S.R.D., grants from the National Institutes of Health (F32 AG022802) and the University of Toronto Dean’s Fund for New Faculty (457494) to T.W.C., an endowment to the Sam and Ida Ross Memory Clinic at Baycrest Centre to T.W.C., and an award from the Jack and Rita Catherall Research Fund at Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care. We thank Asaf Gilboa for collecting some of the control data, Lauren Silver and Adrianna Zec for assistance with scoring and data entry, and Andrew Yonelinas for the algorithm used in Experiment 2.

FundersFunder number
Baycrest Centre
Jack and Rita Catherall Research Fund at Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care
Sam and Ida Ross Memory Clinic
National Institutes of Health
National Institute on AgingF32AG022802
Canadian Institutes of Health Research
University of Toronto457494

    Keywords

    • Familiarity
    • Parkinson's disease
    • Recognition memory
    • Recollection

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Exploring the recognition memory deficit in Parkinson's disease: Estimates of recollection versus familiarity'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this