Exploratory behavior as a function of motivational orientations and task conditions

David Tzuriel, Carl H. Haywood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Twenty-four boys and 24 girls from the 5th and 10th grades, one-half of whom were predominantly intrinsically motivated (IM) while the other half were predominantly extrinsically motivated (EM), were given an interesting task under task-imposed, task-offered and neutral conditions, and their exploratory behavior was observed during an intermission period. IM Ss both explored less and showed less satisfaction under the task-imposed condition than under the other two conditions, preferred a high level of difficulty across all conditions and showed higher diversive curiosity at 15 yr than at 10 yr of age. EM Ss explored about the same amount in all conditions, were less satisfied under the task-imposed condition than under the other conditions, preferred lower-difficulty tasks in the neutral condition than in the other conditions, showed more diversive curiosity at 10 yr than at 15 yr of age and showed more specific curiosity at 15 yr than at 10 yr of age. Personality integration and variation seeking appear to characterize relatively IM persons more than relatively EM persons. Age and gender differences are discussed, and conceptual analysis of performance expectations as a function of IM, task conditions and personality domains is offered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)67-76
Number of pages10
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1984

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