Explaining individual empowerment among elderly women volunteers in nonprofit organizations: The Israeli case

Liat Kulik

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

The study aimed to explain the sense of empowerment in volunteer activity among Israeli women in middle and later life. The sample consisted of 146 women volunteering in social services in Israel. Based on Bronfenbrenner's ecological model of human adaptation to environments, the contribution of three ecological systems to explaining empowerment among volunteer women was examined: the ontogenic system, the microsystem, and the chronosystem. The women reported positive experiences with volunteering, as expressed in high levels of empowerment and family support for volunteer activity. In addition, the findings revealed high levels of satisfaction with rewards of volunteering and low levels of difficulty with the provider organization. The variables that contributed most to explaining empowerment in volunteering were those belonging to the ontogenic system: self-esteem and motives for volunteering. Of the microsystem variables, difficulties with the provider organization and rewards also contributed significantly to explaining empowerment.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHandbook of Business and Finance
Subtitle of host publicationMultinational Companies, Venture Capital and Non-Profit Organizations
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages101-122
Number of pages22
ISBN (Print)9781606928554
StatePublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Ecological model
  • Late adulthood
  • Midlife
  • Volunteering
  • Women

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