Exosome secretion affects social motility in Trypanosoma brucei

Dror Eliaz, Sriram Kannan, Hadassa Shaked, Gil Arvatz, Itai Dov Tkacz, Lior Binder, Hiba Waldman Ben-Asher, Uthman Okalang, Vaibhav Chikne, Smadar Cohen-Chalamish, Shulamit Michaeli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

71 Scopus citations

Abstract

Extracellular vesicles (EV) secreted by pathogens function in a variety of biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, exosome secretion is induced by stress that affects trans-splicing. Following perturbations in biogenesis of spliced leader RNA, which donates its spliced leader (SL) exon to all mRNAs, or after heat-shock, the SL RNA is exported to the cytoplasm and forms distinct granules, which are then secreted by exosomes. The exosomes are formed in multivesicular bodies (MVB) utilizing the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT), through a mechanism similar to microRNA secretion in mammalian cells. Silencing of the ESCRT factor, Vps36, compromised exosome secretion but not the secretion of vesicles derived from nanotubes. The exosomes enter recipient trypanosome cells. Time-lapse microscopy demonstrated that cells secreting exosomes or purified intact exosomes affect social motility (SoMo). This study demonstrates that exosomes are delivered to trypanosome cells and can change their migration. Exosomes are used to transmit stress signals for communication between parasites.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere1006245
JournalPLoS Pathogens
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 Eliaz et al.

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