Dry mycelium of Penicillium chrysogenum protects cucumber and tomato plants against the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica

Dror Gotlieb, Yuji Oka, Bat Hen Ben-Daniel, Yigal Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Incorporation into soil of dry mycelium of Penicillium chrysogenum, a waste product of the pharmacological industry, enhanced plant growth and reduced root galling caused by the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica in cucumber and tomato plants. Incorporation into sandy loam soil in pots of dry mycelium at a concentration of 0.25% (w/w) resulted in complete protection of cucumber plants from the nematode. The number of juveniles recovered from soils containing dry mycelium was greatly reduced even at a concentration of 0.1% (w/w). In microplot studies conducted at two sites in two seasons, with three or four doses, dry mycelium caused a dose-dependent reduction in root galling index (GI) and promotion of plant growth of cucumber and tomato plants. In in vitro studies, the water extract of dry mycelium immobilized nematode juveniles and reduced the egg hatching rate, but these effects were partly reversible after a rinse in water. Soil-drenching of cucumber and tomato seedlings with water extract of dry mycelium did not reduce GI or number of root-invading juveniles. The results show that dry mycelium promotes plant growth and protects plants against nematode infection. Protection, however, does not operate via induced resistance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)217-225
Number of pages9
JournalPhytoparasitica
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003

Keywords

  • Meloidogyne javanica
  • Penicillium chrysogenum
  • Root-knot nematode
  • Soil amendment

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