Drought, Famine and Pestilence in Amoraic Palestine

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13 Scopus citations
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)272-298
Number of pages27
JournalJournal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient
Volume17
Issue number1-3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1974

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Israel, Ministry of Development-Geological Survey, Bulletin no. 41, Jerusalem, 1967, especially pp. z4-34. On climatological theories of the decline of the Roman Empire, (especially those of Huntington, cited below), see my remarks in JESHO, 197z. I should like to express my extreme gratitude to Dr. Gedalia Gevirtzman (geologist) of Jerusalem for calling my attention and interest to various aspects of palaeoclimatology. (The Amoraic period in Palestine covers c. 200-400 C.E.) This research was supported (in part) by the Research Committee, Bar-Ilan University. i) See Krauss, Griechische und Lateinische Lehnsvorter im Talmud, Midrasch und Targum (= LW), 2. (Berlin, 1899) p. 4iob, s.v., for various interpretations, all of which Low (in his comments ad loc.) rejects outright as incorrect. See also Addita-menta ad Aruch Completum, ed. Krauss, p. 30zb, s.v. Jastrow's explanation in his Dictionary of the Talmud Bavli, Yerushalmi, Midrashic Literature and Targumim (= Diet.) p. io2oa s.v. is incorrect, since this usage for xenium was not known in Tannaitic times, (see, eg. Lewis and Short, p. 20iyb, s.v. xenium). readings, For see R. Rabbi- novicz, Variae Lectiones in Mischnam et in Talmud Babylonicum (= Var. Lect.) ad loc., p. io8, note 9. Whatever the exact derivation of this word its general meaning is fairly clear: either diminishing, or irregular (as Jastrow suggests). I would suggest tentatively that is to be related to the Greek meaning "subject to speculation, doubt hesitation," etc. See Liddell & Scott2 1606a, 1608a, s.v. The Hebrew "yod" often replaces the Greek "epsilon". See my note in Ercbei, z, 1 9 74. 2) Ed. Zuckermandel, p. 3 z i .

Funding

Israel, Ministry of Development-Geological Survey, Bulletin no. 41, Jerusalem, 1967, especially pp. z4-34. On climatological theories of the decline of the Roman Empire, (especially those of Huntington, cited below), see my remarks in JESHO, 197z. I should like to express my extreme gratitude to Dr. Gedalia Gevirtzman (geologist) of Jerusalem for calling my attention and interest to various aspects of palaeoclimatology. (The Amoraic period in Palestine covers c. 200-400 C.E.) This research was supported (in part) by the Research Committee, Bar-Ilan University. i) See Krauss, Griechische und Lateinische Lehnsvorter im Talmud, Midrasch und Targum (= LW), 2. (Berlin, 1899) p. 4iob, s.v., for various interpretations, all of which Low (in his comments ad loc.) rejects outright as incorrect. See also Addita-menta ad Aruch Completum, ed. Krauss, p. 30zb, s.v. Jastrow's explanation in his Dictionary of the Talmud Bavli, Yerushalmi, Midrashic Literature and Targumim (= Diet.) p. io2oa s.v. is incorrect, since this usage for xenium was not known in Tannaitic times, (see, eg. Lewis and Short, p. 20iyb, s.v. xenium). readings, For see R. Rabbi- novicz, Variae Lectiones in Mischnam et in Talmud Babylonicum (= Var. Lect.) ad loc., p. io8, note 9. Whatever the exact derivation of this word its general meaning is fairly clear: either diminishing, or irregular (as Jastrow suggests). I would suggest tentatively that is to be related to the Greek meaning "subject to speculation, doubt hesitation," etc. See Liddell & Scott2 1606a, 1608a, s.v. The Hebrew "yod" often replaces the Greek "epsilon". See my note in Ercbei, z, 1 9 74. 2) Ed. Zuckermandel, p. 3 z i .

FundersFunder number
Research Committee, Bar-Ilan University

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