Differential Effects of Simple Frontal Versus Complex Teaching Strategy on Teachers' Stress, Burnout, and Satisfaction

Rachel Ben-Ari, Ronit Krole, Dov Har-Even

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the connections between teaching strategy (complex vs. frontal) and the teacher-related variables of stress, burnout, and satisfaction. In addition, an all-inclusive model was examined that linked the extent of practicing each of the strategies to the teacher-related variables. The results of the study showed that the use of the complex strategy was connected to lower levels of stress and burnout and to higher levels of satisfaction. Within the framework of the all-inclusive model, we found that the complex strategy affected both satisfaction and burnout, whereas the frontal strategy was connected only to satisfaction. Those effects were mediated by the stress variables. The results are discussed from a theoretical, as well as a practical, point of view.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)173-195
Number of pages23
JournalInternational Journal of Stress Management
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2003

Keywords

  • Burnout
  • Stress
  • Teaching strategy

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