”Design my everyday life, my tomorrow, my future, on my own, without anyone helping me”: Future Orientation Among Vocational Education Students in Israel

Nofar Eini, Roni Strier, Avihu Shoshana

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article offers an interpretive examination of the future orientation of students in vocational schools as part of their vocational habitus. Through in-depth interviews with 30 adolescents (16 boys, 14 girls), the study identified three key future orientations: (1) the vague use of the term ‘success’ in the absence of an accompanying description of specific goals for achieving that success; (2) the future described through ‘hard individualism’––a future replete with many challenging anticipated scenarios: constant struggles to achieve goals, lack of control, and an inability to predict reality, becoming accustomed to failures, and self-reliance; (3) preference for occupational independence or being solo self-employed, partially motivated by a desire to avoid future experiences of subordination, exploitation, and humiliation––factors characterising their current employment. The effects and implications of vocational school students’ structural vulnerabilities and experiences of social exclusion on their future orientations are discussed. Further research of future orientation is critical in its role as a component of vocational habitus to achieve a complex understanding of the educational work in vocational schools.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Vocational Education and Training
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Vocational Aspect of Education Ltd.

Keywords

  • Future orientation
  • exclusion
  • solo self-employed
  • vocational education
  • vocational habitus

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of '”Design my everyday life, my tomorrow, my future, on my own, without anyone helping me”: Future Orientation Among Vocational Education Students in Israel'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this