Decreased functional connectivity of the salience network during narrative comprehension in children with reading difficulties: An fMRI study

Emma Twait, Rola Farah, Tzipi Horowitz-Kraus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Dyslexia is a neurobiological learning disability, reflected through deficits in written (i.e. reading) but not in spoken language. Since written and spoken language rely on cognitive control abilities, we aimed to compare functional connectivity of the understudied salience network which is related to cognitive control in children with dyslexia vs. typical readers during a functional MRI narrative comprehension task. Although children with dyslexia showed similar comprehension levels as typical readers, neuroimaging data revealed children with dyslexia showed significantly decreased functional connectivity values of an independent component (IC) related to the salience network. The functional connectivity values in the salience network IC were negatively correlated with behavioral data of working memory in those with dyslexia. These findings further express that dyslexia is manifested through atypical involvement of neural circuits related to EF, specifically the salience network even when attending narratives. Since the salience network is related to switching abilities and error detection, future research should focus on strengthening these abilities early in life for better future reading outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)987-992
Number of pages6
JournalNeuroImage: Clinical
Volume20
DOIs
StatePublished - 2018
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018

Keywords

  • Development
  • Dyslexia
  • Executive function
  • Language
  • Neuroimaging
  • Reading

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