Coping style is associated with parental distress beyond having a mental illness: A study among mothers with and without mental illness

Tali Malka, Ilanit Hasson-Ohayon, Gil Goldzweig, David Roe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: Based on previous literature showing that the association between coping styles and outcome depends on the context in which the coping takes place, the current study assessed the association between coping styles and parental distress among mothers with and without serious mental illness (SMI). Method: A total of 120 mothers (60 with SMI and 60 without) completed coping and parental distress questionnaires. Associations between having'not having a mental illness, coping styles, and parental distress (as a dependent variable) were examined. Results: Having a mental illness was not associated with parental distress, whereas coping styles were. Specifically, for all women (with and without mental illness) coping styles of disengagement and distress externalization were positively related to parental distress. Conclusion and Implications for Practice: Professionals in the field need to be aware of and responsive to the universal stressors of motherhood and support adaptive strategies to cope with such motherhood-related challenges.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)170-173
Number of pages4
JournalPsychiatric Rehabilitation Journal
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 American Psychological Association.

Keywords

  • Coping
  • Mental illness
  • Motherhood
  • Parental stress

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