Conversation, Cohesive and Thematic Patterning in Children's Dialogues

Jonathan Fine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

The investigation of conversation has recently taken several directions including speech act analysis, examination of the linguistic structures used in conversation, and the ethnomethodological approaches of conversational organization. This report presents some interactions among these kinds of approaches that are simultaneously present in spontaneous conversation. It was found that the use of cohesion in conversation is related to the conversational status of the different kinds of turns a speaker may take. The organization of information within clauses was also found to be related to both the turn-taking structure of the conversation and the use of cohesion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)247-266
Number of pages20
JournalDiscourse Processes
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 1978
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
*This research was supported by the Ministry of Education, Ontario; Board of Education for the Borough of North York, Toronto; The Canada Council; Glendon College, York University; and Cornell University. Reprints may be obtained from the author at Dept. of Applied Psychology, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, 252 Bloor St. W., Toronto, Canada M5S 1V6.

Funding

*This research was supported by the Ministry of Education, Ontario; Board of Education for the Borough of North York, Toronto; The Canada Council; Glendon College, York University; and Cornell University. Reprints may be obtained from the author at Dept. of Applied Psychology, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, 252 Bloor St. W., Toronto, Canada M5S 1V6.

FundersFunder number
Glendon College, York University
Ministry of Education, Ontario
Cornell University
Virgin Islands Board of Education
Canada Council for the Arts

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