Control of magnetophoretic mobility by susceptibility-modified solutions as evaluated by cell tracking velocimetry and continuous magnetic sorting

Lee R. Moore, Sarah Milliron, P. Stephen Williams, Jeffrey J. Chalmers, Shlomo Margel, Maciej Zborowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

With the analytical expression for the magnetophoretic mobility of an ideal, linearly polarizable sphere undergoing creeping motion in viscous medium, we have shown that both attractive and repulsive motions are possible in the magnetic field. We have validated theoretical predictions using magnetic monodisperse microspheres of 5.2-μm diameter and nonmagnetic polystyrene microspheres of 6.99-μm diameter suspended in solutions of paramagnetic ions. The microsphere magnetophoretic mobility was measured using a modified particle tracking velocimetry system, developed in-house and called a cell tracking velocimeter. The product of measured mobility and viscosity agrees well with the theoretical prediction, differing only by ∼11%. Further, a 26% increase in resolution between magnetic and nonmagnetic particle distributions was evaluated when paramagnetic ion carrier was used instead of water. Continuous particle sorting based on differences in magnetophoretic mobility was performed with another device developed by us, the quadrupole magnetic flow sorter (QMS). In the QMS, the introduction of paramagnetic ions into the carrier was effective in suppressing nonspecific crossover (i.e., the transport of low-mobility particles into the magnetic particle fraction) in particles and in biologically relevant red blood cells and thus showed promise as a means of increasing the purity of the magnetic separation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3899-3907
Number of pages9
JournalAnalytical Chemistry
Volume76
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Jul 2004

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