Contextual regularity and complexity of neuronal activity: From stand-alone cultures to task-performing animals

A. Ayali, E. Fuchs, Y. Zilberstein, A. Robinson, O. Shefi, E. Hulata, I. Baruchi, E. Ben-Jacob

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Precursors of the superior information processing capabilities of our cortex can most probably be traced back to simple invertebrate systems. Using a unique set of newly developed neuronal preparations and state-of-the-art analysis tools, we show that insect neurons have the ability to self-regulate the information capacity of their electrical activity. We characterize the activity of a distinct population of neurons under progressive levels of structural and functional constraints: self-formed networks of neuron clusters in vitro; isolated ex vivo ganglions; in vivo task-free, and in vivo task-forced neuronal activity in the intact animal. We show common motifs and identify trends of increasing self-regulated complexity. This important principle may have played a key role in the gradual transition from simple neuronal motor control to complex information processing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)25-32
Number of pages8
JournalComplexity
Volume9
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Frontal ganglion
  • Information processing
  • Insect
  • Neural network
  • Neuroplasticity
  • Regulated complexity

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