Consummatory feeding movements in Aplysia fasciata are facilitated by conspecifics with access to mates, by reproductive tract homogenates and by bag cell peptides

S. Blumberg, A. J. Susswein

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    11 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    In Aplysia fasciata, pheromones released by conspecifics with access to mates increase the quantity of food eaten. This effect is blocked when the chemosensory rhinophores are ablated, indicating that the rhinophores sense pheromones. The modulation of feeding by pheromones can be monitored by an increase in the amplitude of swallowing movements in the presence of conspecifics with access to mates. Atrial gland homogenates and four bag cell peptides (egg-laying hormone, and α, β, and γ bag cell peptides) amplify the swallow amplitude in a manner similar to that caused by conspecifics with access to mates, suggesting that peptides from the bag cell/atrial gland family that are released from the atrial gland into the surrounding water may be pheromones regulating feeding and reproductive behaviors.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)175-181
    Number of pages7
    JournalJournal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
    Volume182
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Feb 1998

    Bibliographical note

    Funding Information:
    Acknowledgements We thank Dr. Israel Ziv for collecting and sending atrial glands from A. californica, Silvia Markovich for help in performing some of the experiments, and Itay Hurwitz for comments on an earlier draft of the manuscript. This work was supported by Grant No. I-206-202.08/92 from the German-Israel Foundation for Scientific Research and Development.

    Keywords

    • Aplysia
    • Atrial gland
    • Egg-laying hormone
    • Peptide
    • Pheromone

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