Collaborative plans for complex group action

Barbara J. Grosz, Sarit Kraus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

723 Scopus citations

Abstract

The original formulation of SharedPlans by B. Grosz and C. Sidner (1990) was developed to provide a model of collaborative planning in which it was not necessary for one agent to have intentions-to toward an act of a different agent. Unlike other contemporaneous approaches (J.R. Searle, 1990), this formulation provided for two agents to coordinate their activities without introducing any notion of irreducible joint intentions. However, it only treated activities that directly decomposed into single-agent actions, did not address the need for agents to commit to their joint activity, and did not adequately deal with agents having only partial knowledge of the way in which to perform an action. This paper provides a revised and expanded version of SharedPlans that addresses these shortcomings. It also reformulates Pollack's (1990) definition of individual plans to handle cases in which a single agent has only partial knowledge; this reformulation meshes with the definition of SharedPlans. The new definitions also allow for contracting out certain actions. The formalization that results has the features required by Bratman's (1992) account of shared cooperative activity and is more general than alternative accounts (H. Levesque et al., 1990; E. Sonenberg et al., 1992).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)269-357
Number of pages89
JournalArtificial Intelligence
Volume86
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1996

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This paper is an extension of our paper in IJCAI-93 [ 211. We thank Joyce Friedman for many thought-provokingq uestions,a nd Karen Lochbaum for the samea nd for helpful comments on many drafts. We also thank Michael Bratman. David Israel, and Martha Pollack for commentso n earlier versions, and the anonymous reviewersf or their helpful suggestionsa nd illuminating comments.T his researchw as initiated when the first author was a Harold Perlman Visiting Professor, Hebrew University, Jerusalem. Partial support for the first author was provided by US WEST Advanced Technologies and by NSF Grant Number IRI-9.525915. The second author was supportedi n part by NSF Grant Number IRI-9423967 and the Israeli Science Ministry Grant Number 6288.

Funding

This paper is an extension of our paper in IJCAI-93 [ 211. We thank Joyce Friedman for many thought-provokingq uestions,a nd Karen Lochbaum for the samea nd for helpful comments on many drafts. We also thank Michael Bratman. David Israel, and Martha Pollack for commentso n earlier versions, and the anonymous reviewersf or their helpful suggestionsa nd illuminating comments.T his researchw as initiated when the first author was a Harold Perlman Visiting Professor, Hebrew University, Jerusalem. Partial support for the first author was provided by US WEST Advanced Technologies and by NSF Grant Number IRI-9.525915. The second author was supportedi n part by NSF Grant Number IRI-9423967 and the Israeli Science Ministry Grant Number 6288.

FundersFunder number
Israeli Science Ministry6288
US WEST
National Science FoundationIRI-9.525915, IRI-9423967

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