Closure of the ductus venosus in premature infants: Findings on real- time gray-scale, color-flow Doppler, and duplex Doppler sonography

Norman Loberant, Miriam Herskovits, Mila Barak, Mordecai Ben-Elisha, Sylvia Herschkowitz, Shifra Sela, Nathan Roguin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. Our objective was to use gray-scale, color-flow, and duplex Doppler sonography to study the anatomy, flow pattern, and time of closure of the ductus venosus in healthy premature infants. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. We prospectively examined the ductus venosus in 130 premature infants whom we divided into two groups: Group I comprised 27 neonates of gestational age 28- 32 weeks, and group II comprised 103 neonates of gestational age 33-36 weeks. Neonates who had undergone umbilical vessel manipulation were excluded from the study. All examinations included gray-scale, color-flow, and duplex Doppler sonography. Patency, length, color flow, and Doppler characteristics of the ductus venosus were recorded. Neonates were examined 1-2 days after birth, 6-7 days after birth, and subsequently every 3-4 days until ductus closure was observed. The time of closure of the ductus for the two groups was compared using the chi-square test. RESULTS. The ductus venosus was patent during the initial examination in 128 of the 130 neonates. Doppler waveform was venous with little variation in velocity. Ductus length slightly exceeded 1 cm in both groups. We found a statistically significant difference in the percentage of infants having a patent ductus venosus after the initial examination: At 1 week after birth, ductus patency was shown in 85% of the infants in group I and in 56% of the infants in group II; at 2 weeks, the respective percentages were 42% and 14%; and at 3 weeks, 27% and 0%. CONCLUSION. The ductus venosus is patent 1-2 days after birth in virtually all premature infants. From 6 days after birth and onward, a significantly greater percentage of smaller premature infants (i.e., 28-32 weeks' gestational age) have a patent ductus venosus than do larger premature infants (i.e., 33-36 weeks' gestational age).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)227-229
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume172
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1999
Externally publishedYes

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