Clinical isolate characteristics and demographics of patients with C.jejuni and C.coli infections in Northern Israel, 2015-2021

Ofri Tsafrir, Hanan Rohana, Lior Bousani, Khatib Orsan, Said Abozaid, Maya Azrad, Avi Peretz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

C.coli is a significant cause of foodborne gastroenteritis worldwide, with the majority of cases attributed to C.jejuni. Although most clinical laboratories do not typically conduct antimicrobial susceptibility testing for C.coli, the rise in resistant strains has underscored the necessity for such testing and epidemiological surveillance. The current study presents clinical isolate characteristics and demographics of 221 patients with C.coli (coli and jejuni) infections in Northern Israel, between 2015 and 2021. Clinical and demographic data were collected from patient medical records. Susceptibility to erythromycin, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, and gentamicin was assessed using the standard E-test. No significant correlations were found between bacterial species and patient ethnicity, patient gender, or duration of hospitalization. In contrast, significant differences were found between infecting species and patient age and age subgroup (P < 0.001). Furthermore, erythromycin resistance was observed in only 0.5% of the study population, while resistance to ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, and gentamicin was observed in 95%, 93%, and 2.3% of the population, respectively. The presented study underscores the need for routine surveillance of C.coli antibiotic resistance.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere19
JournalEpidemiology and Infection
Volume152
DOIs
StatePublished - 5 Feb 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s), 2024. Published by Cambridge University Press.

Keywords

  • C.coli, C.jejunigastroenteritis
  • antimicrobial resistance
  • campylobacteriosis

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