Clinical implications and angiographic and electrocardiographic correlation of ST segment elevation in leads V7-V9 in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction

Khaled Adawi, Shaul Atar

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1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: The clinical significance and clinical characteristics of patients with myocardial infarction involving the posterior wall of the left ventricle is not well-defined. The angiographic findings and their correlation with the electrocardiographic (ECG) findings may be of high therapeutic importance. Methods: We retrospectively studied consecutive patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction on the admission ECG to the intensive cardiac care. We studied the clinical and demographic characteristics, the clinical course in-hospital and the clinical outcome (including infarct size, congestive heart failure and significant mitral insufficiency). All patients underwent coronary angiography during the index admission. We correlated the ECG findings on admission to the angiographic findings. Results: We studied 198 patients with mean age of 5712 years (range 30-88 years), 158 men (79.8%) and 40 women (20.2%). Myocardial infarction involving the inferior wall was noted in 119 patients, of whom 68 had inferior wall myocardial infarction only, and 51 had inferior and lateral wall involvement pleads I, AVL and/or V5-V6). Only 4 patients (2%) had ST elevation in leads V7-V9 only. The left ventricular ejection fraction was lowest in patients with anterior wall myocardial infarction (41%6) compared to myocardial infarction with the posterior wall involved (44%8) or myocardial infarction with the inferior wall only (54%6) (p=0.023). The largest infarct size by peak creatine phosphokinase was found in the inferoposterior myocardial infarction group, significantly larger from inferior infarction only, and similar to that of anterior myocardial infarction. The incidence of congestive heart failure was slightly more in anterior myocardial infarction however, significant mitral valve insufficiency was higher in patients with posterior wall involvement, yet with no statistical significance. The infarct related artery causing posterior myocardial infarction was significantly more frequent in the right coronary artery (57.1%) compared to the left circumflex artery (7.5%) (p<0.01). Conclusions: The major artery causing involvement of the posterior wall is the right coronary artery. In patients with myocardial infarction involving the posterior wall, infarct size is similar to that of anterior wall myocardial infarction, and with similar complications rate. However, the incidence of significant mitral valve insufficiency and congestive heart failure is high in patients with posterior wall involvement. Posterior leads assessment should be conducted routinely in patients with suspected myocardial infarction.

Original languageHebrew
Pages (from-to)587-590
Number of pages4
JournalHarefuah
Volume147
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Angiography
  • Electrocardiography
  • Myocardial infarction
  • ST elevation

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