Characteristics associated with COVID-19 vaccine uptake among adults aged 50 years and above in England (8 December 2020-17 May 2021): a population-level observational study

Elise Tessier, Yuma Rai, Eleanor Clarke, Anissa Lakhani, Camille Tsang, Ashley Makwana, Heather Heard, Tim Rickeard, Shreya Lakhani, Partho Roy, Michael Edelstein, Mary Ramsay, Jamie Lopez-Bernal, Joanne White, Nick Andrews, Colin N.J. Campbell, Julia Stowe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine characteristics associated with COVID-19 vaccine coverage among individuals aged 50 years and above in England since the beginning of the programme. DESIGN: Observational cross-sectional study assessed by logistic regression and mean prevalence margins. SETTING: COVID-19 vaccinations delivered in England from 8 December 2020 to 17 May 2021. PARTICIPANTS: 30 624 257/61 967 781 (49.4%) and 17 360 045/61 967 781 (28.1%) individuals in England were recorded as vaccinated in the National Immunisation Management System with a first dose and a second dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, respectively. INTERVENTIONS: Vaccination status with COVID-19 vaccinations. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion, adjusted ORs and mean prevalence margins for individuals not vaccinated with dose 1 among those aged 50-69 years and dose 1 and 2 among those aged 70 years and above. RESULTS: Of individuals aged 50 years and above, black/African/Caribbean ethnic group was the least likely of all ethnic groups to be vaccinated with dose 1 of the COVID-19 vaccine. However, of those aged 70 years and above, the odds of not having dose 2 was 5.53 (95% CI 5.42 to 5.63) and 5.36 (95% CI 5.29 to 5.43) greater among Pakistani and black/African/Caribbean compared with white British ethnicity, respectively. The odds of not receiving dose 2 was 1.18 (95% CI 1.16 to 1.20) higher among individuals who lived in a care home compared with those who did not. This was the opposite to that observed for dose 1, where the odds of being unvaccinated was significantly higher among those not living in a care home (0.89 (95% CI 0.87 to 0.91)). CONCLUSIONS: We found that there are characteristics associated with low COVID-19 vaccine coverage. Inequalities, such as ethnicity are a major contributor to suboptimal coverage and tailored interventions are required to improve coverage and protect the population from SARS-CoV-2.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e055278
JournalBMJ Open
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2022. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • health policy
  • public health

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