Bridging 1D Inorganic and Organic Synthesis to Fabricate Ultrathin Bismuth-Based Nanotubes with Controllable Size as Anode Materials for Secondary Li Batteries

Kai Zong, Tianzhi Chu, Dongqing Liu, Andleeb Mehmood, Tianju Fan, Waseem Raza, Arshad Hussain, Yonggui Deng, Wei Liu, Ali Saad, Jie Zhao, Ying Li, Doron Aurbach, Xingke Cai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The growth of ultrathin 1D inorganic nanomaterials with controlled diameters remains challenging by current synthetic approaches. A polymer chain templated method is developed to synthesize ultrathin Bi2O2CO3 nanotubes. This formation of nanotubes is a consequence of registry between the electrostatic absorption of functional groups on polymer template and the growth habit of Bi2O2CO3. The bulk bismuth precursor is broken into nanoparticles and anchored onto the polymer chain periodically. These nanoparticles react with the functional groups and gradually evolve into Bi2O2CO3 nanotubes along the chain. 5.0 and 3.0 nm tubes with narrow diameter deviation are synthesized by using branched polyethyleneimine and polyvinylpyrrolidone as the templates, respectively. Such Bi2O2CO3 nanotubes show a decent lithium-ion storage capacity of around 600 mA h g−1 at 0.1 A g−1 after 500 cycles, higher than other reported bismuth oxide anode materials. More interestingly, the Bi materials developed herein still show decent capacity at very low temperatures, that is, around 330 mA h g−1 (−22 °C) and 170 mA h g−1 (−35 °C) after 75 cycles at 0.1 A g−1, demonstrating their promising potential for practical application in extreme conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2204236
JournalSmall
Volume18
Issue number39
DOIs
StatePublished - 28 Sep 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Authors. Small published by Wiley-VCH GmbH.

Keywords

  • Bi O CO nanotubes
  • Li-ion batteries
  • anode materials
  • low-temperature performance

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