Botulinum toxin injections for chronic sialorrhoea in children are effective regardless of the degree of neurological dysfunction: A single tertiary institution experience

Murali Mahadevan, Maayan Gruber, Darin Bilish, Kathryn Edwards, David Davies-Payne, Graeme van der Meer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective To determine the effectiveness of submandibular salivary gland Botulinum Toxin Type-A (BTX-A) injection in the treatment of drooling in children with varying degrees of neurological dysfunction. Methods A retrospective review of pre- and post-procedure drooling frequency and severity scores of patients receiving BTX-A between January 2008 and January 2013. Stratification to different subgroups of neurological impairment was performed according to Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) score. Drooling severity was assessed using Thomas-Stonell and Greenberg symptom questionnaires administered at time of initial consultation and 3 months after treatment. Results 48 sets of BTX-A injections in 26 patients with an average age of 9.45 years (range 7 months–18 years) were included in the study. Marked improvement in drooling was seen in 60.4% of patients, a marginal or brief improvement was seen in 20.8% and there was no improvement in 18.8%. No adverse events were reported following any of the BTX-A injections. BTX-A was safe and effective in the eight patients with pre-existing swallowing dysfunction. Subsequent drooling surgery was performed in 15 (57.7%) of the cohort, all 15 patients responded to BTX-A injections. In patients with Cerebral Palsy, there was no correlation between the severity of the neurological dysfunction as measured by the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) score and the response to BTX-A treatment. Conclusions Injection of BTX-A to the submandibular glands of children with neurological disorders is a safe procedure and results in a reduction in drooling in the majority of patients. Children with severe neurological dysfunction respond to BTX-A injections as effectively as their less impaired peers and the degree of response does not appear to be associated with the severity of neurological disability. BTX-A injection is a good initial procedure when drooling surgery is being considered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)142-145
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Volume88
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2016
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd

Keywords

  • Botox
  • Botulinum toxin type-A
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Drooling
  • Sialorrhoea
  • Submandibular glands

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