Bone marrow stem cells and biological scaffold for bone repair in aging and disease

S. Srouji, E. Livne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

48 Scopus citations

Abstract

The loss of bone mass observed in aging enhances the risk of fractures. The process of bone repair in aging is slow and limited due to reduced activity of the osteoblasts. Bone marrow stem cells (MSCs) residing in the bone marrow are the progenitors for osteoblasts. The ability to enhance healing of bone defect in aging by MSCs can contribute in the prevention of the complications resulting from long-term immobilization that are especially fatal in old age. Our aim was to test the ability of MSCs inserted into a biological scaffold to enhance bone defect repair. Osteoprogenitor cells were selected from rat bone marrow stem cells cultured in DMEM medium supplemented with FCS, antibiotics, ascorbic acid, β-glycerophosphate, and dexamethasone. The selected osteogenic subpopulation was identified by osteocalcin immunohistochemistry as well as Alizarin red S and von Kossa staining which are specific for bone matrix and mineral deposition. Committed osteoprogenitor cells cultured on the hydrogel scaffold were transplanted into the area of a rat tibia segmental bone defect and examined after 6 weeks. Radiology images revealed that 6 weeks post-implantaion, calcified material was present in the site of the defect, indicating new bone formation. It is concluded that committed osteogenic MSCs contained in a biocompatible scaffold can provide a promising surgical tool for enhancement of bone defect healing that will minimize the complications of bone repair in aging and disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)281-287
Number of pages7
JournalMechanisms of Ageing and Development
Volume126
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2005
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was supported by VPR Grant No. 182-262. The authors wish to thank Mrs. Pessia Schenzer for her excellent technical assistance.

Funding

This study was supported by VPR Grant No. 182-262. The authors wish to thank Mrs. Pessia Schenzer for her excellent technical assistance.

FundersFunder number
VPR182-262

    Keywords

    • Aging
    • Bone defect
    • Growth factors
    • Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)
    • Scaffold

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