Bacteroides is increased in an autism cohort and induces autism-relevant behavioral changes in mice in a sex-dependent manner

Julie Carmel, Nasreen Ghanayem, Rasha Mayouf, Natalia Saleev, Ipsita Chaterjee, Dmitriy Getselter, Evgeny Tikhonov, Sondra Turjeman, Monia Shaalan, Saleh Khateeb, Alla Kuzminsky, Netta Kvetniy-Ferdman, Tanya Kronos, Tali Bretler-Zager, Omry Koren, Evan Elliott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental condition which is defined by decreased social communication and the presence of repetitive or stereotypic behaviors. Recent evidence has suggested that the gut-brain axis may be important in neurodevelopment in general and may play a role in ASD in particular. Here, we present a study of the gut microbiome in 96 individuals diagnosed with ASD in Israel, compared to 42 neurotypical individuals. We determined differences in alpha and beta diversity in the microbiome of individuals with ASD and demonstrated that the phylum Bacteroidetes and genus Bacteroides were the most significantly over-represented in individuals with ASD. To understand the possible functional significance of these changes, we treated newborn mice with Bacteroides fragilis at birth. B. fragilis-treated male mice displayed social behavior dysfunction, increased repetitive behaviors, and gene expression dysregulation in the prefrontal cortex, while female mice did not display behavioral deficits. These findings suggest that overabundance of Bacteroides, particularly in early life, may have functional consequences for individuals with ASD.

Original languageEnglish
Article number103
Journalnpj Biofilms and Microbiomes
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 18 Dec 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023, The Author(s).

Funding

We would like to thank Teva Pharmaceuticals for sponsorship of the study as part of its support for the Bar Ilan University Faculty of Medicine. EE is further supported by a grant from the Israeli Science Foundation (1159/22). OK is supported by the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (Grant agreement ERC-2020-COG No. 101001355). We would like to thank Teva Pharmaceuticals for sponsorship of the study as part of its support for the Bar Ilan University Faculty of Medicine. EE is further supported by a grant from the Israeli Science Foundation (1159/22). OK is supported by the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (Grant agreement ERC-2020-COG No. 101001355).

FundersFunder number
Bar Ilan University Faculty of Medicine
Teva Pharmaceutical Industries
Horizon 2020 Framework Programme101001355, ERC-2020-COG
European Research Council
Israel Science Foundation1159/22

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Bacteroides is increased in an autism cohort and induces autism-relevant behavioral changes in mice in a sex-dependent manner'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this