Attitudes, behavioral intentions, and risk perceptions of fatigued pedestrians

Tova Rosenbloom, Ariela Beigel, Ehud Eldror

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

We used the theory of planned behavior (Ajzen, 1991) to examine pedestrians' attitudes, behavioral intentions, and risk perceptions in relation to the possibility of sustaining an injury while crossing the road while in a fatigued compared to a nonfatigued state. Participants were 205 students who were randomly selected and divided into 2 groups. One group completed an attitudinal questionnaire about crossing the road in a fatigued state, a questionnaire about their perceptions of the risk of injury as pedestrians when crossing the road in a fatigued state, and a demographic questionnaire; the other group completed a questionnaire about their perceptions of the general risk of injury as pedestrians regardless of level of fatigue, and a demographic questionnaire. No difference was found between the groups in terms of their perceptions of the risk of injury as pedestrians whether in a fatigued state or not. However, it was found that gender did affect perception, with the average risk perception of females being significantly higher than that of males. A positive correlation was found between attitudes toward safety and subjective safety behavioral norms, and perceptions of the risk of injury as a pedestrian.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1263-1270
Number of pages8
JournalSocial Behavior and Personality
Volume39
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

Keywords

  • Behavioral intention
  • Fatigue
  • Pedestrian
  • Risk perception
  • Theory of planned behavior

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