Animals in Biblical and Ancient Near Eastern Law: Tort and Ethical Laws

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Abstract

This article examines the attitude toward animals in the Pentateuch and ancient Near Eastern legal codes. Employing a comparative approach, it analyzes criminal and tort law in relation to animals and their carers—stealing and finding animals used in factory farms, the responsibility of watchmen and renters, and that of the legal “owners” of animals who cause damage. Demonstrating how animals form part of the biblical ethical system, in which ethical demands become binding statutes, it looks at why this process only occurred in the Hebrew Bible and not in other ancient Near Eastern cultures.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)166-181
Number of pages16
Journal Journal of Animals Ethics
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2018

Bibliographical note

In Press

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