An in vitro analog of learning that food is inedible in Aplysia: decreased responses to a transmitter signaling food after pairing with transmitters signaling failed swallowing

Miryam Levy, Jian Jing, Abraham J. Susswein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

An in vitro analog of learning that a food is inedible provided insight into mechanisms underlying the learning. Aplysia learn to stop responding to a food when they attempt but fail to swallow it. Pairing a cholinergic agonist with an NO donor or histamine in the Aplysia cerebral ganglion produced significant decreases in fictive feeding in response to the cholinergic agonist alone. Acetylcholine (ACh) is the transmitter of chemoreceptors sensing food touching the lips. Nitric oxide (NO) and histamine (HA) signal failed attempts to swallow food. Reduced responses to the cholinergic agonist after pairing with NO or HA indicate that learning partially arises via a decreased response to ACh in the cerebral ganglion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)278-281
Number of pages4
JournalLearning and Memory
Volume30
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press. All rights reserved.

Funding

We thank Dr. Itay Hurwitz for comments on the manuscript. A.J.S. received funding from the U.S.-Israel Binational Science Foundation (grant no. 2017624), the Israel Science Foundation (grant no. 2396/18), and the National Institutes of Health (grant no. 1R01NS118606-01). J.J. received funding from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (grant nos. 32171011, 31861143036, 31671097, and 31371104).

FundersFunder number
National Institutes of Health1R01NS118606-01
United States-Israel Binational Science Foundation2017624
National Natural Science Foundation of China31861143036, 31371104, 32171011, 31671097
Israel Science Foundation2396/18

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