Allies or foes: the interplay between al-Azhar and the Muslim Brotherhood following Egypt’s 2011 uprising (2011–2021)

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Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between al-Azhar and the Muslim Brotherhood (MB) following the 2011 Egyptianuprising. While the interplay between them in the pre-revolutionary period was mostly shaped by the gap between the status of al-Azhar as a body of statist Islam and the MB as a dissident Islamist movement, Mubarak’s downfall yielded a change in their status, raising the question of its effect on their attitude toward one another. Though on the face of it, following Morsi’s ouster, al-Azhar seems to have reverted to its traditional position of backing the de-legitimization campaign of the authoritarian regime against the MB, the paper portrays a more intricate picture: not one of close affinity during the MB’s rule despite the potential to realize common interests and advocate centrist Islam, but one of competition over religious authority; not one of utter hostility following al-Azhar’s support of the coup, but one of restrained conflict.

Original languageEnglish
JournalMiddle Eastern Studies
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Keywords

  • Arab Spring
  • Egypt
  • Islam
  • Muslim Brotherhood
  • Religious authority
  • al-Azhar

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