A sharp rise in the incidence of Hodgkin's lymphoma in young adults in Israel

Samuel Ariad, Irena Lipshitz, Daniel Benharroch, Jacob Gopas, Micha Barchana

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Hodgkin's lymphoma is a distinct primary solid tumor of the immune system that shows wide variation in incidence among different geographic regions and among various races. It was previously suggested that susceptible people living in certain parts of Israel had a higher risk of HL because of exposure to unidentified environmental factors in these regions. Compared with other parts of Israel, these regions were characterized by a higher proportion of Israeli-born Jews. Objectives: To study time trends in the incidence rate of HL in Israeli-born Jews of all age groups during the years 1960-2005. Results: A total of 4812 Jewish cases of HL were reported to the Israel Cancer Registry during the study period 1960-2005. There has been a persistent increase in the age-standardized incidence rate of HL, all subtypes pooled, in Israeli-born Jews in both men and women. The age distribution pattern in both genders was bimodal in all periods. The highest incidence was observed in the 20-24 year age group: for women (9.13 per 100,000 per year) during the period 1988-1996, and for men (6.60 per 100,000 per year) during the period 1997-2005. Conclusions: The reported incidence level of HL in Israeli-born young adult Jews in Israel has increased in recent years to high levels compared with other western countries. Our findings suggest a cohort effect to unidentified factors affecting Israeli-born young adult Jews in Israel.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)453-455
Number of pages3
JournalIsrael Medical Association Journal
Volume11
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Hodgkin's lymphoma
  • Incidence
  • Measles
  • Time trend
  • Young adults

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