A repetitive DNA sequence that characterizes human papillomavirus integration site into the human genome is present in vulvar vestibulitis

Jacob Bornstein, Doron Zarfati, Oren Fruchter, Nimrod Goldshmid, Haim Abramovici

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To determine the DNA sequence of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products obtained from surgical specimens of patients with severe vulvar vestibulitis, in order to identify and type the human papillomavirus (HPV)-DNA associated with vulvar vestibulitis. Study Design: Fifty three women, referred for dyspareunia and diagnosed as having severe vestibulitis, underwent perineoplasty operation consisting of surgical removal of the sensitive vestibule. PCR analysis using L1 HPV primer was performed, and DNA sequencing of the samples that were found to contain HPV-DNA was undertaken, using the dideoxy chain termination method. Results: Using PCR, HPV-DNA was detected in 31 of 53 tissue specimens (58%). DNA sequencing of 12 HPV-positive PCR products revealed extensive homology to human Alu consensus sequence, albeit not to any known HPV sequence. Conclusions: The presence of interspersed, repetitive-DNA sequence Alu, which is known to be the preferred site for HPV integration into human genome, in the PCR product reinforces previous observations, suggesting that HPV may have a role in the pathogenesis of vulvar vestibulitis. It further implies a possible integration of the HPV into human DNA in these cases. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)173-176
Number of pages4
JournalEuropean Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology
Volume89
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2000
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alu sequence
  • DNA sequencing
  • Human papillomavirus
  • Polymerase chain reaction
  • Vulvar vestibulitis

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