A clinical evaluation of nuclear estrogen receptors combined with cytosolic estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer

D. Loven, E. Rakowsky, A. Geier, B. Lunenfeld, A. Rubinstein, B. Klein, H. Lurie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Breast cancer tissue from 95 women was simultaneously assayed for three receptors: cytosolic estrogen (CER), cytosolic progesterone (CPR), and nuclear estrogen (NER). The main objective was to determine whether the addition of NER assay to the currently accepted practice with only CER and CPR could improve the predictive capacity of receptors. Forty‐two patients were studied for response to hormone therapy and 95 patients were studied for survival; the median follow‐up period was 73 months (range, 8 to 300 months). The incidence of CER+, CPR+, and NER+ was 74%, 70%, and 52%, respectively. Each receptor appeared more frequently, although not significantly so, in higher age groups. Forty percent of tumors had all three receptors positive and 14% had all negative; the remaining tumors showed all possible combinations of receptors. Both the rate of response and survival curves among 70 patients with CER+ did not show any significant difference whether NER was positive or negative. Also, among 38 patients with CER+, CPR+, and NER+, there was no significant difference in the clinical outcome as compared to 17 patients with CER+, CPR+, and NER‐. Among 25 patients with CER‐ the rare occurrence of NER+ in only three patients did not suggest any clinical implication. It is concluded, therefore, that on overall clinical grounds the current series does not support the addition of NER assay whenever data is available on both CER and CPR.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)341-346
Number of pages6
JournalCancer
Volume66
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Jul 1990
Externally publishedYes

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